Hip Replacement

If your hip has been damaged by arthritis, a fracture or other conditions, common activities such as walking or getting in and out of a chair may be painful and difficult. Your hip may be stiff and it may be hard to put on your shoes and socks. You may even feel uncomfortable while resting.

If medications, changes in your everyday activities, and the use of walking aids such as a cane are not helpful, you may want to consider hip replacement surgery. By replacing your diseased hip joint with an artificial joint, hip replacement surgery can relieve your pain, increase motion, and help you get back to enjoying normal, everyday activities.

Illustration of the anatomy of a normal hip.

Illustration of the anatomy of a normal hip.


Illustration of the worn cartilage, narrow joint space and the damage to the weight-bearing surface in a hip with arthritis.

Illustration of the worn cartilage, narrow joint space and the damage to the weight-bearing surface in a hip with arthritis.


Illustration of a hip replacement where cement is used to secure the prosthesis.

Illustration of a hip replacement where cement is used to secure the prosthesis.


Illustration of a hip replacement where no cement is needed to secure the prosthesis. This technique is used in younger patients.

Illustration of a hip replacement where no cement is needed to secure the prosthesis. This technique is used in younger patients.

Types Of Hip Replacement

Total Hip Replacement
Hip replacement (total hip replacement), is a surgical procedure in which the hip joint is replaced by a prosthetic implant. Replacing the hip joint consists of replacing both the acetabulum and the femoral head. Such joint replacement orthopaedic surgery generally is conducted to relieve arthritis pain or fix severe physical joint damage as part of hip fracture treatment.

Hemiarthroplasty
Hemiarthroplasty is a surgical procedure which replaces one half of the joint with an artificial surface and leaves the other part in its natural (pre-operative) state. This class of procedure is most commonly performed on the hip after a subcapital (just below the head) fracture the neck of the femur (a hip fracture). The procedure is performed by removing the head of the femur and replacing it with a metal or composite prosthesis. The most commonly used prosthesis designs are the Austin Moore prosthesis and the Thompson Prosthesis. More recently a composite of metal and HDPE which forms two interphases (Bipolar Prosthesis) has also been used. The bipolar prosthesis has not been shown to have any advantage over monopolar designs. The procedure is recommended only for elderly and frail patients, due to their lower life expectancy and activity level. This is because with the passage of time the prosthesis tends to loosen or to erode the acetabulum.

Hip Resurfacing Procedure
The method is an alternative to hip replacement surgery. It is a bone conserving procedure that places a metal cap on the femoral head instead of amputating it. There is no long stem placed down the femur so it is more like a natural hip. This procedure is for patients who have a good bone, and may allow patients a return to many activities following hip resurfacing surgery.

Conditions Treated By Hip Replacement

Arthritis
Fracture
Osteoarthritis
Osteoporosis

Symptoms Treated By Hip Replacement

Crackling noise of the joint
Hip pain
Humid or cold weather increases hip pain
Joint pain
Stiffness in hip joint

Service Providers

Henry Small, M.D.

Dr. Small is a board certified orthopedic surgeon. He has 23 years of experience.