Traumatic Injury Repair

Injury or bodily injury is damage or harm caused to the structure or function of the body caused by an outside agent or force, which may be physical or chemical, and either by accident or intentional. Personal Injury also refers to damage caused to the reputation of another rather than physical harm to the body.

Common Procedures To Treat Traumatic Injuries:

Arthroscopy

Arthroscopy (also called arthroscopic surgery) is a minimally invasive surgery in which an examination and sometimes treatment of damage of the interior of a joint is performed using an arthroscope, a type of endoscopy that is inserted into the joint through a small incision. Arthroscopic procedures can be performed either to evaluate or to treat many orthopedic conditions including torn floating cartilage, torn surface cartilage, ACL reconstruction, and trimming damaged cartilage.

Joint Replacement

Joint Replacement, also known as Arthroplasty (literally “surgical repair of joint”), is an operative procedure of orthopedic surgery performed, in which the arthritic or dysfunctional joint surface is replaced with something better or by remodeling or realigning the joint by Osteotomy or some other procedure.

Rotator Cuff Repair

Since many patients with partial tears and some even with complete tears can respond to non-operative management, generally conservative care is offered first. If a significant trauma such as a shoulder dislocation, or fracture, or high energy force is known to have been followed by complete to near complete loss of rotator cuff- mediated motion and strength, then an operative work-up is initiated with plans to proceed to surgery for repair, if confirmatory.

The three commonly used surgical techniques for rotator cuff repair are: Open repair, Mini-open repair and All-arthroscopic repair. An individual surgeon’s ability to repair a torn rotator cuff and achieve a satisfactory result varies by technique. Variation is based on experience and familiarity with the technique. Although one surgeon may be capable of achieving a quality repair through all-arthroscopic means, another may have better results with mini-open repair. Prior to surgery, patients should discuss the options available to them with their surgeon. The surgeon can share results of using different techniques so that the most appropriate treatment plan can be designed.

Fractures

The following treatments are used for various types of fractures.

Cast Immobilization

A plaster or fiberglass cast is the most common type of fracture treatment, because most broken bones can heal successfully once they have been repositioned and a cast has been applied to keep the broken ends in proper position while they heal.

Closed reduction

A procedure to restore normal alignment of a fractured bone or dislocated joint in which the fractured bones are simply manipulated and no incision is needed.

External Fixation

In this type of treatment, pins or screws are placed into the broken bone above and below the fracture site. Then the orthopaedic surgeon repositions the bone fragments. The pins or screws are connected to a metal bar or bars outside the skin. This device is a stabilizing frame that holds the bones in the proper position so they can heal. After an appropriate period of time, the external fixation device is removed.

Functional Cast or Brace

The cast or brace allows limited or “controlled” movement of nearby joints. This treatment is desirable for some but not all fractures.

Intramedullary nailing or rodding

A procedure for the fixation of fractures in which a nail or rod is inserted into the intramedullary canal of the bone from one of its two ends

Open Reduction and Internal Fixation

In this type of treatment, an orthopedist must perform surgery on the bone. During this operation, the bone fragments are first repositioned (reduced) into their normal alignment, and then held together with special screws or by attaching metal plates to the outer surface of the bone. The fragments may also be held together by inserting rods down through the marrow space in the center of the bone. These methods of treatment can reposition the fracture fragments very exactly. Because of the risks of surgery, however, and possible complications, such as infection, they are used only when the orthopaedic surgeon considers such treatment to be the most likely to restore the broken bone to normal function.

Traction

Traction is usually used to align a bone or bones by a gentle, steady pulling action. The pulling force may be transmitted to the bone through skin tapes or a metal pin through a bone. Traction may be used as a preliminary treatment, before other forms of treatment.

Each of these treatment methods can lead to a completely healed, well-aligned bone that functions well. Remember that the method of treatment depends on the type and location of the fracture, the seriousness of the injury, the condition and needs of the patient, and the judgment of the orthopaedist and the patient.

Conditions Treated by Traumatic Injury Repair

Fracture
Traumatic Injury

Symptoms Treated by Traumatic Injury Repair

Achy joints
Back pain
Broken bones
Elbow pain
Hip pain
Joint aches
Joint swelling
Knee pain
Knee swelling
Muscle weakness
Neck pain
Shoulder pain
Shoulder swelling
Sudden popping noise

Service Providers

Henry Small, M.D.

Dr. Small is a board certified orthopedic surgeon. He has 23 years of experience.

Vivek P. Kushwaha, M.D.

Dr. Kushwaha has been honored with the Memorial Hermann Hospital Award for “Most Efficient Surgeon” and was commended as one of “America’s Top Physicians” by The Consumer Research Council of America.